Productivity Skills: John Acuff teaches you how to finish your numerous goals

“I’ve never had a problem starting. I’ve started a million things, but i never finish them. Why can’t I finish?” This book is about solving this never-ending problem.

After reading this book:

  • You will feel like you can finish your list of unfinished goals
  • You will probably make your list of goals longer
  • You will have a system for finishing anything

Why I was skeptical at first

I have a problem(s): I’m interested in too many things, and I’m quickly bored with tasks at hand—probably a sign of ADHD. I’ve tried to get help from various apps (todoist, any.do, freedom, etc.) and books (some even call it a ‘gift’, like The Renaissance Soul by Margaret Loberstine). None were of help—maybe for a week or two. After reading this book’s description, I was stunned for a second: it tackled the exact problem I was facing, finding a solution sounded too good to be true.

Something specific I really like

I really like that the author focuses on making goals fun, then it’s harder to choose new challenges. Let’s say you want to lose weight. Instead of writing down a so-called S.M.A.R.T goal (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Time-Bound), like losing 5 kg in 3 months, you could challenge your friend to a weight loss competition. Who loses the most weight in 3 months wins a massage session (the loser pays for it). Fun right? It reminds me of the Sober-October challenge that Joe Rogan did with his friends.

Another thing I really like

Tracking your progress is important, not only tasks/goals completed (like most productivity apps), but also…the time spent doing them, inches lost, miles run, pages or words written, etc. This helps to silence the perfectionist in you (or the denier), showing real progress. Maybe you are trying to lose weight, but the scale isn’t moving as much as you have expected…that’s not perfect. After measuring your body, you find that you have made huge progress, replacing fat with muscle. It’s also possible that you need to readjust, because time spent on exercising isn’t delivering any results.

Tracing your goals is great way to get more process oriented, making everything else a byproduct, like achieving your goals.